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The Oakland General Strike, The Days Before, The Days After

From: Autonomous Struggle of the Glittertariat

What follows is my personal account of the events that led up to the Oakland General Strike of the 2nd of November, 2011. This takes the form of much personal narrative mixed with analysis, while I'm still analyzing and thinking through the events, and while the longer term effects are unknown, to get these experiences in writing while they are still fresh. I apologize in advance for any rambling or roughness in the narrative.

To the Occupy Movement

We are so inspired to be part of this new movement of people, struggling on behalf of the 99% against a system that allows corporations to run the world. We are thrilled about the wide use of direct democracy and popular assemblies, the participation of unions and community groups, and the honest efforts to include the voices of the most oppressed. We consider these the basic building blocks of a healthy society based on freedom and equality – which is what we're fighting for.

Analytical & Strategic Considerations for Occupy*

First I have to thank many of my comrades for inspiration. Many of the ideas herein have been sourced from conversations and are directly ripped off from close friends. If the points below seem a little unruly at times it is because I have been working on this piece on and off between going to occupations all over the Northeast, but I do not want to hold off any longer. Like Bakunin often left us with pieces written in the heat of struggle, this is a work in progress. The first part is a brief analysis that should not be unfamiliar to anarchists so far, it has been a common theme in most critiques I have seen. The second half is some strategic considerations that hopefully will help us think more about our role in this movement.

Podcast on workers' control

Podcast on Workers' Control

"What happens when those who work for others decide to take their collective destinies into their own hands and manage themselves? That's a question workers around the world have answered in different forms over the 140 years since the Paris Commune. Scholar and activist Immanuel Ness discusses the history, across time and place, of workers' control and workers' councils."

Announcing Common Struggle - Libertarian Communist Federation!

Attention allies in North America and beyond! The organization formerly known as the North Eastern Federation of Anarchist Communists is henceforth:

Common Struggle - Libertarian Communist Federation

Decided upon at our 23rd conference held in Boston, MA this past Labor Day weekend.

We have been considering a change since the departure and organizational growth experienced by our comrades in both Common Cause (Ontario) and Union Communiste Libertaire (Quebec).

Freedom / Libertad #5

Freedom / Libertad #5

We are proud to release issue #5 of Freedom/Libertad, Common Struggle's bilingual periodical. This issue features a brand new design and professional printing from our friends at the worker-run Red Sun Press.

The articles include:
-Vermonters Win Universal Healthcare
-The Fight Against Whole Foods
-Egypt: The Revolution Lives on

Less Talk, More Regroupment

A piece on revolutionary strategy and getting organized by southerner Jasper Conner author of Towards a Student Unionism

The Struggle of Sports in Prisons

We as human beings feel the need for physical activities. Unfortunately, not every single one of us has the opportunity or ability to do what we love due to the circumstances.

A Critique of Anti-Assimilation, Part I

By Operaista
Reposted from Glittertariat

AKA "Why I hate the term 'classism'"; "Why I hate inverted hierarchies" will be Part II

A really big, important concept in radical queer thought and struggle is Anti-Assimilation, which, at its most basic, is "we don't want to elevate our position in the social order by becoming as much like the straights as possible"; clearly, there are a wide variety of possible positions that could be described as anti-assimilationist by that decision - from the communist position of "abolish the present state of things, the revolution is communization" to a very reformist view that just seeks to allow all genders, sexualities, expressions, etc, to be put on an equal footing. Between these two very different poles lie most people who would describe themselves as anti-assimilationist; in fact, I bet many who read this would point out that the very limited, reformist view of anti-assimilationism is not held by many who would use the term (which is true).

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