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Common Struggle

The Economic Crisis and Anarchist Ways Forward

Wayne Price and Eric Larsen at the New York Anarchist Bookfair, 4/11/2009

Struggle Changes Everything: Direct Action Organizing Panel & Discussion

Saturday, April 10, 2010
5:00pm - 8:00pm
Community Church of Boston
565 Boylston St.
Boston, MA

Panel, followed by discussion, composed of individuals with experience in different organizations around soliciting grievances and mobilizing around labor, housing, and immigration issues.

Panelists will talk about their organizing experiences and strategic orientation. Specifically panel will address how taking collective action and directly confronting bosses, landlords, and other powerful institutions brings a sense of empowerment and consciousness to those involved. Discussion will focus on how best to support, network, organize, and/or supplement these activities.

Sponsored by NEFAC.
Info: boston@nefac.net, (617)544-3932

Nature of the Period: Background and Perspectives

Social systems don't live forever. They have their own internal contradictions, which produce systemic crises. Capitalism is no different; someday it will end. The question we are addressing is whether it will be followed by barbarism, mass death, and barrenness, or by a better world. The current crisis is not only one of greatly increased attacks on the working class and oppressed people but is also a fundamental crisis of the system itself. We cannot predict the demise of the system, something in which the working class and oppressed people must also play a conscious part. We can, however, state that this is the most serious crisis of capitalism since the 1930's--and that one was only "solved" by World War II.

An understanding of today's world crisis must begin at the end of that previous crisis.

Common Struggle - Libertarian Communist Federation Constitution

Common Struggle - Libertarian Communist Federation Constitution
Updated September 2011

Bank Tenants Fight to Stay in Their Homes

Things look bleak for bank tenants, because banks make bigger profits from selling mortgages than from collecting rents on low-income properties. But in New England, people are coming together to confront banks and, in many cases, they are winning. The cost of contested evictions is forcing banks to accede to tenants’ demands to stay in their homes, while the increasing number of bank tenants fighting eviction is developing into a movement. People are turning to each other for solidarity in direct actions to defend their homes and to make their voices heard.

Read on for stories from Massachusetts and Rhode Island...

Libertad #3

Anunciamos la edición #3 de 'Libertad,' el boletín bilingüe de NEFAC-Nueva Inglaterra.

Descargarla aquí.
Ediciones anteriores: #2, #1

Close Guantánamo

Some of us attended a rally in downtown Boston, calling on the Obama administration to shut down the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba. Local anti-war activists re-committed themselves to the struggle to end torture and repression in the name of the so-called "War on Terror." President Obama has yet to follow through on an executive order he signed in January, 2009 that would shut down the facility completely. Shutting down Guantánamo Bay should be seen as one step in stopping State repression world wide.

Review of “Capitalism: A Love Story”

by Abbey Volcano

Michael Moore’s latest documentary is a critique of capitalism- in mainstream theaters- pretty big deal. “Capitalism: A Love Story” starts off comparing the US to the Roman Empire- a fairly easy task. In addition to other commentary, the documentary seems to be focused on the anti-capitalist stance of various Catholic priests, the consequences of the housing crisis, corporate bailouts and, finally, some alternatives in the form of worker-run workplaces.

The History of NEFAC in Quebec-city (2001-2008)

from 'Ruptures' – Spring 2009 special edition

While it is too early to draw a comprehensive balance sheet of NEFAC (in Québec City, and in the province of Québec), one can nevertheless find some items that are food for thought.

Journeys of an Expropriated Coat

by Frotchie

My coat was born in the Lebow Clothing Factory in 1985, shortly before the owner closed it down, firing several hundred seamstresses and quietly knocking away one of the last bastions of manufacturing that stood in the way of Baltimore's inevitable transformation into a post-industrial wasteland. The factory was closed, locked, and boarded up, and no one bothered to remove anything from inside. Endless rows of sewing machines sat rusting, great hay-bale sized rolls of textile lay collecting dust, and this coat, along with twelve thousand of its brethren, hung neatly wrapped in plastic, unseen and forgotten. Like the women who made it, it became redundant, unwanted, a discarded relic of a dying era...

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