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IWW / Black Rose Study Group -- Fight 4 $15

IWW / Black Rose Study Group -- Fight 4 $15
Sun, April 6, 1pm – 3pm

Join us to discuss the Fight for $15, fast food and other service workers' organizing efforts, and the potential role of radicals. Please bring friends and coworkers.

Pittsburgh rallies to support locked-out Steel Workers

Pittsburgh rallies to support locked-out Steel Workers of Local 1005 of Hamilton, Ontario.

On Jan. 29th, 2011, at 1pm, two cities showed that workers' solidarity
cannot be confined by national borders. While the steel workers of
Ontario's Local 1005 and thousands of their supporters held a march and
rally to protest US Steel for locking them out of their jobs, their fellow
workers and allies held a protest at the US Steel Headquarters in
Pittsburgh, PA.

Baltimore Campus Service Workers Rights Forum, April 6th

The situation: At four universities in Baltimore-—Towson, Morgan State, Coppin State and Johns Hopkins—-the campus food service or facilities workers are fighting to get back their union, UNITE HERE Local 7.

Journeys of an Expropriated Coat

by Frotchie

My coat was born in the Lebow Clothing Factory in 1985, shortly before the owner closed it down, firing several hundred seamstresses and quietly knocking away one of the last bastions of manufacturing that stood in the way of Baltimore's inevitable transformation into a post-industrial wasteland. The factory was closed, locked, and boarded up, and no one bothered to remove anything from inside. Endless rows of sewing machines sat rusting, great hay-bale sized rolls of textile lay collecting dust, and this coat, along with twelve thousand of its brethren, hung neatly wrapped in plastic, unseen and forgotten. Like the women who made it, it became redundant, unwanted, a discarded relic of a dying era...

Operation Sold Out II: The Failed General Strike in British Columbia in 2004

Agitating for a general strike, Mayday 2004.

The most significant period of labor unrest in British Columbia since 1983 took place in late April and early May of 2004, as a result of the failed province-wide “General Strike” movement. During this period, dissatisfaction with government policies and ensuing legislation escalated into wildcat strikes, walkouts, and significant mass public support for the actions of labor unions, community groups, and students in opposition to the government.

Very little has been written on the attempted general strike from the perspective of those in British Columbia, and even less from those who were actually involved in the actions that took place around May Day of 2004. The lack of critical theory and analysis of what happened is unacceptable in light of the current situation, and the challenges faced not just by working people throughout the province, but also across the country. Without a thorough understanding of how the general strike movement operated, and how it failed, the labor movement in British Columbia will be sentenced to continual failure and decline.

Montréal: Lancement du Réseau de solidarité des travailleurs-euses

Soirée publique et lancement officiel du :


Dimanche 8 mai
Café Petite Gaule
2525 rue Centre
métro Charlevoix

Grève Générale!: The 1972 Rebellion in Quebec

by George "Mick" Sweetman

"Not since the days of the Industrial Workers of the World, since the days of Joe Hill and the battle for the eight-hour day, has a North American union movement been so dedicated to the tradition of revolutionary syndicalism."
- Marcel Pepin (jailed President of the Confederation of National
Trade Unions, 1972)

Thirty-two years ago one of the largest working class rebellions in North American history exploded in Quebec. 300,000 workers participated in North America's largest general strike to that date, radio stations were seized, factories were occupied, and entire towns were brought under workers' control. What made the rebellion possible was not only an explosive mix of economic exploitation, national oppression, and government repression, but was also a strong, young, and radicalized rank and file of the Quebec trade union movement.

FLOC and the Mt Olive Campaign: an Anarchist Perspective

The Mount Olive Pickle boycott is over.

In the face of a growing boycott promoted by activists of many hues, but dominated by anti-capitalists and with a large anarchist contingent, the bosses have relented. The Farm Labor Organizing Committee (FLOC) has been recognized as representing the workers in the cucumber fields of North Carolina.

by prole cat

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