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The History of NEFAC in Quebec-city (2001-2008)

from 'Ruptures' – Spring 2009 special edition

While it is too early to draw a comprehensive balance sheet of NEFAC (in Québec City, and in the province of Québec), one can nevertheless find some items that are food for thought.

Journeys of an Expropriated Coat

by Frotchie

My coat was born in the Lebow Clothing Factory in 1985, shortly before the owner closed it down, firing several hundred seamstresses and quietly knocking away one of the last bastions of manufacturing that stood in the way of Baltimore's inevitable transformation into a post-industrial wasteland. The factory was closed, locked, and boarded up, and no one bothered to remove anything from inside. Endless rows of sewing machines sat rusting, great hay-bale sized rolls of textile lay collecting dust, and this coat, along with twelve thousand of its brethren, hung neatly wrapped in plastic, unseen and forgotten. Like the women who made it, it became redundant, unwanted, a discarded relic of a dying era...

Northeastern Anarchist #14, 2009

Radicalizing Reality Forums

Welcome to Black Rose/Rosa Negra - Boston's Radicalizing Reality Forums reference page. We hope to use this page to compile resources and media from our forums, exploring the intersections of radical politics and grassroots organizing!

Upcoming Forums:

Resisting Walls & Bars II

Saturday March 1 2014
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Community Church of Boston
565 Boylston Street, Copley Square, Boston, MA
617-356-ROSA (7672)
rosanegra.boston@gmail.com

ACORN Breaks Into Foreclosed House to Restore it to its Former Owner

by Elie Feasley and Frotchy (Baltimore-Washington NEFAC)

At 3pm on Thursday, February 19th, fifty members and supporters of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) gathered outside a boarded-up rowhome in Highlandtown. ACORN representatives handed out t-shirts printed in black, red, and white proclaiming a foreclosure-free-zone as the crowd of supporters grew. Followed closely by reporters and news cameras, the group used a pair of boltcutters to remove a padlock, broke down the door, and entered the house. Louis Beverly, an organizer with ACORN, declared, "This is our house now!" after cutting off the lock. The house was formerly owned by Donna Hanks, a fiery woman who has seen her life turned upside down by an adjustable rate mortgage and mounting bills. She was evicted last month after falling victim to foreclosure. Clearly exhausted and embittered, but eager to continue the fight, she proclaimed, "This place is gutted. This is wrong." She will soon begin moving back in to the house. Before they left, ACORN replaced the lock on the door with one belonging to Hanks.

Wall Street Gets Bailed Out, Philly Gets Thrown Out

By Sean West (Philly NEFAC)

Despite news of a massive economic crisis sounding throughout the nation, we in Philly seemingly got a break from the bad news in the later weeks of October into November. We partied. The Phil’s won the World Series, resulting in wild, rowdy festivities up and down Broad Street (and a wee bit of rioting). Halloween celebrations went off across the city with their usual flair and fun. Then, in early November the wild street parties went off again when the election of Barack Obama on Tuesday, November 4th brought to an end eight years of neoconservative rule.

Then, announcing a sweeping round of cuts to social services and city government to balance the budget, Mayor Nutter crashed the party on November 6th. . I’ll be fair and say that the budget crisis is not entirely of the Mayor’s making. He’s dealing with an economic crisis brought about by the misdeeds and quest for profit-at-any-expense brought about by Wall Street, major financial institutions, and the rich, which is now hitting home in many major American cities and municipalities. Wall Street has been bailed out while working people have been thrown out of their homes and jobs, have left college for lack of tuition and cities have been left to fend for themselves.

CHANGE WE NEED: An Anarchist Perspective on the 2008 Election

The election is over. Barack Obama will become the next president of The United States. The news of Obama's victory resulted in spontaneous celebrations across the country. The energy was infectious and everywhere conversations seemed to contain a positive outlook that people in the U.S. have not known for many long years. Words like change and hope are being used, and it seems widely assumed that the election of Obama will herald a new age of social justice, an end to the wars, and significant reduction in the racism the plagues U.S. society. But as the energy and media spectacle dies down, we would like for you to consider the election from a different perspective. It is our belief as Class Struggle Anarchists that elections in a capitalist society in fact can never bring true justice and security to the average working person. We do not believe that such elections can with any degree of permanence prevent wars, or deal effectively with racism, sexism or environmental degradation.

Report from the Boston Dyke March



The Boston Dyke March took place on Friday evening, June 13th. The march is a grassroots, non-commercial, alternative to the Pride Parade which takes place the next day. This was our first year tabling at the event, which was great.

The event started at the Boston Common, where people met up and mingled around the gazebo. About 2,000 people turned out for the march. Before dusk, the march hit the streets, making a loop through the Back Bay and returning to the Common. The tone was festive yet defiant. Chants could be heard above the rhythms of the Batucada Belles.

Back at the Common, we held down the NEFAC table, with NEA's, a piece on Queer Liberation and Anarchist Communism, political prisoner info from the Jericho Movement and a flyer in support of the New Jersey 4, a group of working class African-American Lesbians from Newark, NJ who are doing between 3.5 and 11 years in prison for defending themselves against assault. The info was well received, and we were able to raise some funds for the NJ4. As darkness settled in, Zili Mizik opened up the celebration.

The Ecological Challenge: Three Revolutions are Necessary

by Alternative Libertaire

For decades, anti-capitalists have rightly raised the question of the “redistribution of wealth” between the Global North and Global South. This idea has commonly been imagined to mean an end to the pillage of the Third World by the advanced industrialized powers, so that the people of the Global South are able to attain an equivalent level of development. This demand, put simply, means that the South should catch up to the North’s "standard of living."

But this old view is clumsy and over-simplified, since certain countries are already fully in the process of "taking their share" of the cake that is Planet Earth, and this is accelerating the destruction of the great ecological balances. The arrival of China and India as industrial, political and military powers obliges revolutionaries to rethink, from top to bottom, issues surrounding the model of development itself.

With a planetary ecological crisis on hand, it can no longer be denied that socialism will be incompatible with mass production and mass consumption. Indeed, even without returning to Malthusian catastrophe theories, we are forced to admit that the planet’s resources are not inexhaustible. These resources could provide for humanity’s needs, but only if they are used in a reasonable and rational way, i.e., in a manner directly opposed to capitalist logic, which in itself is a source of imbalance.

Immigration in the Baltimore-Washington Corridor

Welcome to America
by John Parson

There are many “facts” currently being circulated about illegal immigrants, particularly from the conservative groups like Help Save Virginia and Help Save Maryland. Supposedly, per their “experts,” illegal immigrants drain our economy, mooch off of our system, burden our schools and communities, raise our crime rates, lower our housing values, and generally rape and defile our good old home grown American culture. They would have you believe that illegal immigration is the key issue in our country, and that “illegals” are a plague to our society that must be removed.

These groups will suggest that immigrants drive down property values, raise crime rates, and ruin our communities. However, these ideas are nothing more than the same arguments presented against the poor and working class communities in any city in America, especially areas where whites are in the minority. It’s a sign of class division and poverty, not immigration status. Rather than being a legitimate argument against immigration, it is nothing more than rehashing the same old case for gentrification.

It’s time for all of us, as workers, to recognize the plain and simple truth: “illegal” or not, we are all human beings, we all have needs, and immigrants face the same struggles as us: a boss who seeks to exploit us, and a wealthy few who seek to control us. Regardless of who we are, or where we’re from, we are workers. Its time to stop griping about immigrants “taking our jobs,” “destroying our language,” or “destroying our culture,” realize such vitriol is nothing more than a lie, and join with the immigrant community in struggle. We must recognize anti-immigrant policy, and anti-immigrant lies, do nothing but divide the working class, and if we seek any realistic gain, such divisions must be erased.

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